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pink peppered turkey steaks

Wed, 7 April, 2021

⯆ JUMP TO RECIPE

Peppered steaks, but not what you’d think! It’s turkey breast steak and pink peppercorns. Plus there’s a sauce for turkey steak to absolutely die for.

pink peppered turkey steaks cuisinefiend.com

Turkey meat not just for Christmas

Turkey meat is available all year round though quite a few people must think it only magically arrives at Christmas. A good thing too that you can buy it all seasons because it is very healthy, lean and a versatile source of protein. You don’t have to stuff it to enjoy it.

My attitude towards turkey steaks is somewhat ambivalent: bland but useful, just like chicken breast. And it has the added value over chicken fillets of a more steakable shape.

You can mallet it lightly and fashion into scaloppini: cheaper and less controversial than veal. It can be used pretty much in any recipe instead of chicken breast fillet, like chicken rarebit or fried chicken. It can replace chicken in stir fries as well: lemon chilli turkey for one. And if you have mixed turkey meat, not just breast but thighs and/or drumsticks, it will make very good burgers.

turkey steaks with pink peppers and anchovy sauce cuisinefiend.com

How to season turkey steaks?

But as said above, it is quite flavourless. Turkey breast fillet off the bone and without the excitement of a whole bird roasting is a little boring. It’s not always the way though to hit bland meat with lots of spice. Just a little, gentle heat I’ve found goes best - hence the pink peppercorn turkey discovery.

Peppered steak is a common dish: coarsely crushed peppercorns, sifted off to rid of the finest, hottest powder, will form a lovely crust on beef fillet or sirloin. But black pepper is too harsh for white meat – unlike the pink.

The peppers and the berries

It could be due to the fact that pink peppercorns are not peppers but berries; closer related to Sichuan peppercorns (also not peppers) than Piper Nigrum of the Piperaceae family. Both pinks and Sichuans have the lovely, tingling, slightly numbing taste on your tongue with pinkies also being distinctly milder than Sichuans.

This is one of those marvellous dishes where the preparation takes only a few minutes but the outcome is positively showy.

turkey steaks with pink peppercorns cuisinefiend.com

How to prepare turkey steaks

I like to flatten the turkey steaks lightly on a cutting board with a meat mallet or a handle of a large knife, only to even out the thickness. I always moan about the fact that even good butchers ignore the meat grain direction and cut steaks out of the turkey breast in the most cost-effective way, rather than across the grain. But to be fair, it is delicate meat so even sliced lengthwise it cooks quickly and tenderly.

The peppercorns can be crushed in a pestle and mortar or placed in a sturdy food bag and bashed with a rolling pin. Best if there is a mix of whole, crushed and shattered corns for a varied texture to the steak.

In this instance I don’t salt the meat beforehand but like to mix coarse smoked salt with the peppercorn crumbs. The mix spread over a plate or a tray should coat the steaks generously on both sides, but it isn’t advisable to keep them coated for too long, or the salt will work too pungently on the meat.

peppered turkey steaks with gherkin anchovy sauce cuisinefiend.com

The sauce for turkey steaks

The sauce to go with the steaks is another showy element, next to still-pink dressing of the meat. It’s easy and versatile and so delicious I swear I could have it with my dinners every night.

It’s not strictly pan juice-based sauce because some peppercorns will drop and burn in the frying pan while frying the steaks. I like to cook the sauce separately in a small skillet, to keep it clean.

Nigella's anchovy ideas

It’s amazingly simple and I’m indebted to Nigella Lawson’s anchovy recipes from her Cook, Eat, Repeat book. It is all about melting a couple of anchovy fillets in a little butter with finely diced gherkin and stirring cream into the mix. Capers instead of gherkin are another option but I can never NOT use a gherkin if I have a chance.

Together the turkey steaks, the pink pepper and the salty-sour sauce work beautifully. Chalk this one up for when we are allowed to have people round for dinners again, post-pandemic!


pink peppered turkey steaks

Servings: 2Time: 15 minutes

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 turkey breast fillet steaks
  • 25g (4 tbsp.) pink peppercorns
  • 1 tbsp. coarse smoked salt
  • 1 tsp groundnut oil
  • 1 tbsp. butter
  • 2 anchovy fillets
  • 100ml (½ cup) dry white wine
  • 1 gherkin
  • 3 tbsp. double cream


METHOD

1. Place the turkey steaks on a chopping board and lightly flatten with a mallet so that they are even thickness of about 1-1.5cm.

2. Place the peppercorns and salt in pestle and mortar and crush gently; you don’t want to grind it to a powder.

pink peppers and smoked salt cuisinefiend.com

3. Spread the mix on a large plate and press the steaks into it on both sides to coat as evenly as you can.

coating turkey steaks with pink peppers cuisinefiend.com cuisinefiend.com

4. Heat a large, preferably non-stick frying pan over medium heat and brush with the 1 tsp oil. If your pan isn’t non-stick, coat it with a little more oil.

5. Add the steaks to the hot pan and fry over medium-high heat for about 3-5 minutes on each side. Remove onto pre-heated plates and keep warm.

how to fry turkey steaks cuisinefiend.com

6. Prepare the sauce: in a tiny skillet or saucepan melt the butter and the anchovy fillets. Turn up the heat a little and pour in the wine. Leave it to cook off for a minute or two.

7. Chop the gherkin finely and add it to the sauce. Cook for half a minute, add the cream and bring the sauce to a simmer.

the best sauce for turkey steaks cuisinefiend.com

8. Spoon the sauce onto or around the steaks and serve.

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