Cuisine Fiend https://www.cuisinefiend.com

roast sirloin of beef

JUMP TO RECIPE -

roast sirloin of beef

A lot of people argue that technology is killing skills and arts: of doing research, remembering things, handwriting and assessing when a meat joint is cooked simply by looking/touching/smelling.

I might have exaggerated slightly the last bit, but no question a digital probe, oven thermometer and above all an electric oven that keeps temperature at a constant all help produce perfectly roasted meat. There are no excuses any more for sad shrunken charcoaled topsides or a partly raw turkeys. Some clever ovens even do it for you: enter your meat weight etc. and out it pops perfect after a while – allegedly. I don’t trust the auto programmes enough to try them out but that’s just me – old-school cookery snob.

Not that I’m so old-school-skilled: I tried the famous base-of-thumb steak test and could tell no difference between my palm and the bit of cow on the skillet – either we both were dead or I’m useless like that. I usually depend on timing rather than smell/touch but even that does sometimes let me down: the beef being a tough old boot or bad mojo. Of course there are many other factors in play: the quality of meat being undeniably the most decisive.

low temperature roasted beef

But with the techie assistance you are also able to reach new heights of excellence, low temperature cooking being one of them. The lucky ones, who have been fed sous-vide cooked meats and loved them, rejoice: low temp is pretty much like sous-vide without the palaver, water baths and the expensive kit. It is crucial to sear the joint before roasting: unless you’re a fan of bland and pale and don’t give a stuff for Maillard’s reaction, the mouth-watering effect of caramelisation. The meat is cooked fantastically even throughout; it works for beef, lamb and even pork loin. There’s no need to rest it as it doesn’t shrink and expand, releasing juices. The downside is no gravy, but that can always be cooked separately from scratch.

The caveat: abandon all hope if you don’t own a digital probe of some kind. I wouldn’t attempt to try and time low temperature cooking as related to weight: I simply can’t afford to waste so much good beef for testing. But even internet failed me there – the best resource for low temperature cooking is Donald Russel and even they insist a thermometer is a must.

Well, all I can say is: get yourself one. Most are not hugely expensive and work well, with the in-oven ones being a bit more fickle. Buy one and try it out on low temp roasts – you’ll thank me.

roast sirloin of beef

Servings: 4Time: about 2 hours

INGREDIENTS

  • 1kg (2 pounds) beef sirloin
  • salt and black pepper
beef sirloin


METHOD

Bring the beef to room temperature before roasting. Season generously with salt.

Preheat the oven to 80C/176F with a roasting tray on the middle rack.

Sear the beef joint in a frying pan over high heat on all sides, for at least a minute on each side. Transfer it to the preheated roasting tray and season with black pepper. If you have an ovenproof food probe, insert it in the middle of the joint horizontally. If you don’t but have a probe or thermometer, you will need to check the temperature after an hour. Place the meat in the oven.

sirloin roast

Roast it until the internal temperature reads 55C/130F for medium-rare, which will take about 1 hour 15-30 minutes for a portion that size. The roast doesn’t need much resting and it can be carved pretty much straight away.

Cuisine Fiend's

Your comments and questions

most recent

Newsletter

Sign up to receive the weekly recipes update


fiendishly...

Follow Fiend